Still More Ballads and Folk-Songs from the Southern Highlands- Henry 1932

Still More Ballads and Folk-Songs from the Southern Highlands
by Mellinger E. Henry
Source: The Journal of American Folklore, Vol. 45, No. 175 (Jan. - Mar., 1932), pp. 1-176

STILL MORE BALLADS AND FOLK-SONGS FROM THE SOUTHERN HIGHLANDS
COLLECTED BY MELLINGER E. HENRY

[Abbreviated references: Jovrnal, Journal of American Folk-Lore; Cox, Folk-Songs of the South; Campbell and Sharp, English Folk Songs from the Southern Appalachians; Wyman and Brockway, Lonesome Tunes; Pound, American Ballads and Songs; Reed Smith, The Traditional Ballad and its South Carolina Survivals; Scarborough, On the Trail of Negro Folk-Songs; Sandburg, The American Songbag; Shoemzaker, North Pennsylvania Minstrelsy; Barry-Eckstorm--Smyth, British Ballads from Maine; Davis, Traditional Ballads of Virginia; Pound, Syllabus, Folk-song of Nebraska and the Central West: A Syllabus; Gray, Songs and Ballads of the Maine Lumberjacks; Hudson, Specimens of Mississippi Folk-Lore; Shearin and Combs, A Syllabus of Kentucky Folk-songs; Barry, Ancient British Ballads (a privately printed list); Belden, A Partial List of Song-Ballads and other popular poetry Known in Missouri. Second Edition (1910); Lomax, Cowboy Songs and other Frontier Ballads; McGill, Folk-Songs of the Kentucky Mountains; Colcord, Roll and Go Songs of American Sailormen; Combs, Folk-Songs du Midi des Etats-Unis.]

I. THE TWA SISTERS. Child, No. 10
A.
Recorded by Mrs. Henry from the singing of Miss Cora Clark, Crossnore, Avery County, North Carolina, July 12, 1929. Campbell and Sharp (No. 4) quote four versions, one from North Carolina and three from Virginia. Pound (No. 4) gives the N. C. version from Campbell and Sharp and a Missouri version imported from Kentucky from H. M. Belden's "Old Country Ballads in Missouri", Journal of American Folk-Lore, XIX, p. 233. See also Sharp: Folk-Songs of English Origin, 2nd series, pp. 18-21; Cox, No. 3; Gray, p. 75; Hudson, No. 3; Journal, XVIII, 130; Kittridge, Journal, XXX, 286; Cox, The School Journal and Educator (West Virginia), 1916, XLIV, 428, 441 -442. Davis, Traditional Ballads of Virginia, No. 5 (eleven versions); Shearin and Combs, p. 7; Pound, Syllabus, p. 11; Barry-Eckstorm-Smyth, British Ballads from Maine, p. 40; Belden, No. 2; Barry, No. 3; R. W. Gordon; New York Times Magazine, Oct. 9, 1927, p. Io. Add Barry, Journal, XVIII, 130-132 (two texts: A with air, B reprinted in Barry-Eckstorm- Smyth, 40-41; Gray, 75); Sharp MSS., Harvard University Library: several texts with airs, collected in the Southern Highlands. The present text with the exception of a few verbal differences is close to that in James Watt Raine's The Land of the Saddle Bags, Richmond, 1924, p.118, which is the same as that of Richardson and Speath's American Mountain Songs, New York, 1927, p. 27, though no mention is there made of the source. Prof. Raine says of this ballad (p. 117): "Many of the ballads have a refrain in which all the auditors may join. Sometimes the refrain has no connection with the story, as in the short lines of 'The Two Sisters'. 'Bowee Down!' and 'Bow and balance to me!' are a remnant from an old dance jingle, which was occasionally sung by dancers even after the music was furnished by the fiddle. 'Bowee' was originally 'Bow ye' but it has dropped the 'y' and become 'bowee', as is common inScottish familiar speech. The triple repetition of the first line in every stanza is a frequent characteristic of ballads, - it gives intensity to the tale."

In connection with B and C, both from Mrs. Harmon, it will be interesting to note Mr. Phillips Barry's remarks, quoted in the headnote of No. 5 of this collection, from the Bulletin of the Folk-Song Society of the Northeast, No. 2, p. 6, that C on the authority of Child is more nearly complete in its theme than A and B of this group. He says: "According to all complete and uncorrupted forms of the ballad, either some part of the body of the drowned girl is taken to furnish a musical instrument, a harp or a viol, or the instrument is wholly made from the body" (English and Scottish Popular Ballads, edited by Helen Child Sargent and George Lyman Kittredge; Cambridge, 1904, p. 18).


1. There lived an old lord by the Northern Sea,
Bow'e down!
There lived an old lord by the Northern Sea,
Bow and balance to me!
There lived an old lord by the Northern Sea
And he had daughters, one, two, three.
I'll be true to my love,
If my love will be true to me.

2. A young man came a-courtin' there,
Bow'e down!
A young man came a-courtin' there,
Bow and balance to me!
A young man came a-courtin' there
And fell in love with the youngest fair.
I'll be true to my love,
If my love will be true to me.

3. He bought the youngest a beaver hat,
Bow'e down!
He bought the youngest a beaver hat,
Bow and balance to me!
He bought the youngest a beaver hat;
The oldest sister didn't like that.
I'll be true to my love,
If my love will be true to me.

4. The sisters walked down to the river brim,
Bow'e down!
The sisters walked down to the river brim,
Bow and balance to me!
The sisters walked down to the river brim;
The oldest pushed the youngest in.
I'll be true to my love,
If my love will be true to me.

5. "Sister, O sister, lend me your hand,"
Bow'e down!
"Sister, O sister, lend me your hand,"
Bow and balance to me!
"Sister, 0 sister, lend me your hand;
I'll give to you my house and land."
I'll be true to my love,
If my love will be true to me.

6. She floated down to the miller's dam,
Bow'e down!
She floated down to the miller's dam,
Bow and balance to me!
She floated down to the miller's dam;
The miller pulled her safe to land.
I'll be true to my love,
If my love will be true to me.

7. From off her finger he took five gold rings,
Bow'e down!
From off her finger he took five gold rings,
Bow and balance to me!
From off her finger he took five gold rings
And then he threw her back in.
I'll be true to my love,
If my love will be true to me.

8. They hanged the miller on a gallows so high,
Bow'e down!
They hanged the miller on a gallows so high,
Bow and balance to me!
They hanged the miller on a gallows so high,
The oldest sister standing close by.
I'll be true to my love,
If my love will be true to me.

B. "The Two Sisters." Recorded by Mrs. Henry from the singing of Mrs. Samuel Harmon, Cade's Cove, Blount County, Tennessee, August 13, 1930.

1. Two little sisters loved one man,
Sing I dum, sing I dey;
Two little sisters loved one man;
The boys are bound for me.
Two little sisters loved one man;
Johnny loved the youngest the little the best, -
Says I'll be kind to my true-love,
If she'll be kind to me.

2. Johnny bought the youngest a beaver hat,
Sing I dum, sing I dey;
Johnny bought the youngest a beaver hat;
The boys are bound for me.
Johnny bought the youngest a beaver hat;
The oldest one thought hard of that, -
Says I'll be kind to my true-love,
If she'll be kind to me.

3. Johnny bought the youngest a gay, gold ring,
Sing I dum, sing I dey;
Johnny bought the youngest a gay, gold ring;
The boys are bound for me.
Johnny bought the youngest a gay, gold ring
And never bought the oldest a single thing, -
Says I'll be kind to my true-love,
If she'll be kind to me.

4. Two little sisters going down the stream,
Sing I dum, sing I dey;
Two little sisters going down the stream;
The boys are bound for me.
Two little sisters going down the stream;
The oldest pushed the youngest in, -
Says I'll be kind to my true-love,
If she'll be kind to me.

5. "Sister Martha, give me your hand,"
Sing I dum, sing I dey;
"Sister Martha, give me your hand;"
The boys are bound for me.
"Sister Martha, give me your hand;
You may have my house and land," -
Says I'll be kind to my true-love
If she'll be kind to me.

6. "Sister Martha, give me your glove,"
Sing I dum, sing I dey;
"Sister Martha, give me your glove;"
The boys are bound for me.
"Sister Martha, give me your glove
And you may have my own true-love,"
Says I'll be kind to my true-love
If she'll be kind to me.

7. "I'll neither give you my hand nor glove,"
Sing I dum, sing I dey;
"I'll neither give you my hand nor glove;"
The boys are bound for me.
"I'll neither give you my hand nor glove,
But I will have your house and love," -
Says I'll be kind to my true-love
If she'll be kind to me.

8. She floated down in the miller's dam,
Sing I dum, sing I dey;
She floated down in the miller's dam;
The boys are bound for me.
She floated down in the miller's dam;
The miller drawed her safe to land.
Says I'll be kind to my true-love
If she'll be kind to me.

9. The miller robbed her of her gold,
Sing I dum, sing I dey;
The miller robbed her of her gold;
The boys are bound for me.
The miller robbed her of her gold
But he plunged her into a deeper hole, -
Says I'll be kind to my true-love
If she'll be kind to me.

10. The miller was hung on a gallows so high,
Sing I dum, sing I dey;
The miller was hung on a gallows so high;
The boys are bound for me.
The miller was hung on a gallows so high;
Sister Martha burnt close by, -
Says I'll be kind to my true-love
If she'll be kind to me.

C. "The Two Sisters." Also recorded by Mrs. Henry from the singing of Mrs. Samuel Harmon, Cade's Cove, Blount County, Tennessee, August 13, 1930.

1. Was two sisters loved one man,
Jelly flower jan;
The rose marie;
The jury hangs o'er
The rose marie.

2. He loved the youngest a little the best,
Jelly flower jan;
The rose marie;
The jury hangs o'er
The rose marie.

3. Them two sisters going down stream,
Jelly flower jan;
The rose marie;
The jury hangs o'er
The rose marie.

4. The oldest pushed the youngest in,
Jelly flower jan;
The rose marie;
The jury hangs o'er
The rose marie.

5. She made a fiddle out of her bones,
Jelly flower jan;
The rose marie;
The jury hangs o'er
The rose marie.

6. She made the screws out of her fingers,
Jelly flower jan;
The rose marie;
The jury hangs o'er
The rose marie.

7. She made the strings out of her hair,
Jelly flower jan;
The rose marie;
The jury hangs o'er
The rose marie.

8. The first string says, "Yonder sets my sister on a rock
Tying of a true-love's knot,"
Jelly flower jan;
The rose marie;
The jury hangs o'er
The rose marie.

9. The next string says, "She pushed me in the deep so far."
Jelly flower jan;
The rose marie;
The jury hangs o'er
The rose marie.

2. THE THREE RAVENS (The Twa Corbies) Child, No. 26.
A. "The Twa Corbies".
Obtained from Mrs. Henry C. Gray, Route 3, Box 499, Terre Haute, Indiana. The ballad, therefore, does not come from the southern highlands, but came as a result of meeting Mrs. Gray while on a ballad-quest in the Great Smoky Mountains. It was copied by the writer from an end-paper apparently of an old bound volume of magazines in the possession of Mrs. Gray. Just as the text was about to be sent to the printer, Mr. Phillips Barry pointed out that it is identical with the version in Cleveland's Compendium. It was then decided not to reprint the text. However, on Mr. Barry's suggestion it is again printed. He says in a letter of June 26, 1931:

"It seems to me that Mrs. Gray's text of 'The Two Corbies' might well be included in your collection with the other two texts. The use of Cleveland's Compendium was so universal in American high schools that it is not likely that Mrs. Gray's grandfather was the only person who learned the 'Two Corbies' from it. There is, after all, not so very much difference between a school-book and a broadside or a songster, when it is a question of giving a particular song text a new start in oral tradition. The volume of Vermont Folk-Songs and Ballads, just published by the Stephen Daye Press, Brattleboro, Vermont, has on pp. 19 ff., a song, 'Margaret Gray', sung to a variant of an air widely known among folk-singers. The song was written by Julia C. R. Dorr, and was first printed in 1868; apparently it was learned from a volume of her poems, and, having passed into oral
tradition became attached to the tune to which it was sung."

As Mrs. Gray was not certain that the ballad was copied down by her grandfather, it will be just as well to quote what she has to say about the song:

"I am very much afraid I can't help you greatly on the 'Twa Corbies'. As I have told you, it was in an old volume of bound magazines, that was among those given me by my quaker great-aunt. She lived to be a very old lady, and all her life had been a great student, and collector of china, books, lustre ware, etc. She read constantly and remembered all she read. She was a great one for clipping, and her books are full of clippings. This book that the ballad was found in, I believe, was among the hundred or so she bought of a church. Some one in a town north from here willed a lot of books to a church. They were stamped 'Good Shephard Library, Linton, Ind.' Some way or other they got down here to St. Luke's, an Episcopal mission. They were such books that the rector thought were not altogether fitting for a church library and at a church sale one time he sold them all. My Aunt, true to form, bought them all. This end-paper may have been in the book when she bought it or she may have put it in for safe keeping. It appears to be a fly leaf of an old volume; the hand writing resembles hers a tiny bit. Another complex: You recall that there were notes written on the other side. They strangely resemble my grandfather's writing. He was a surgeon, and traveled and studied abroad often. He brought Aunt Libbie many old books from London and Edinborough. This may have been in one of them. If only I had found them before Aunt Libbie died, she would have told me. Here is the case, as clear as a maze:

(1) It came from an old book from London or Edinborough.
(2) It was copied by some one abroad from printed matter.
(3) It was copied by some one abroad from memory.
(4) It was copied by Aunt Libbie from printed matter.
(5) It was copied by Aunt Libbie from memory.
(6) It was copied by some one in Linton who owned the book - from printed matter or memory.

Any way, some one fancied the selection at some time, and wrote it from memory or copied it, any time from twenty-five to a hundred and twenty-five years ago. It has not been recently copied, that I know, for that book had not been looked into for at least eight years and probably not for double that time. If it is Aunt Libbie's writing it was written at least thirty-five years ago. Her writing the last few years did not look like that. Personally I don't think it was Aunt Libbie's writing or even grandfather's on the other page, but father thought that it might possibly be."

Child reminds us that Scott says of "The Twa Corbies" that it was "rather a counterpart than a copy" of "The Three Ravens" (English and Scottish Popular Ballads, edited by Helen Child Sargent and George Lyman Kittredge, Cambridge, 1904, p. 45. Cf. also Sir Walter Scott's Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border, London, 1839, p. 235). See Barry, No. 27; Campbell and Sharp, No. Io; Cox, No. 6; Davis, No. 10; Hudson, No. 6; Sharp, Folk-Songs of English Origin, 2nd Series, p. 22; Reed Smith, Journal, XXVII, 63 and XXVIII, 201; Tatlock, Journal, XXXI, 273. B and C are fragments of "The Three Crows", a comic variety of "The Three Ravens". Cox in his head-note (No. 6) gives a number of references to the comic versions of the song. Add to these Heart Songs, p. 485. Parodies of the song may be found in Davis, No. 10 (appendices, P. 145). Mr. Barry sent the following comment: "The longer form of the song, which consists of Scott's text, expanded and altered by Allan Cunningham, was printed in 1825 in Cunningham's Songs of Scotland, Vol. I, pp. 289-290. He changed 'corbies' to 'ravens' in the first line. The editor of Cleveland's Compendium thought 'ravens' was neither archaic nor Scotch enough; he changed Cunningham's 'ravens' back to 'corbies'."

1. There were two corbies sat on a tree,
Large and black, as black might be;
And one the other gan say:
"Where shall we go and dine today?
Shall we go dine by the wild salt sea?
Shall we go dine 'neath the greenwood tree?"

2. "As I sat on the deep sea sand,
I saw a fair ship nigh at land.
I waved my wings, I bent my beak,
The ship sunk and I heard a shriek.
There they lie - one, two and three.
I shall dine by the wild salt sea."

3. "Come, I will show ye a sweeter sight,
A lonesome glen, and a new-slain knight.
His blood yet on the grass is hot,
His sword half drawn, his shafts unshot,
And no one kens that he lies there
But his hawk, his hound, and his lady fair.

4. "His hound is to the hunting gane,
His hawk to fetch the wild fowl hame,
His lady's away with another mate;
So we shall make our dinner sweet;
Our dinner's sure, our feasting free;
Come, and dine by the greenwood tree.

5. "Ye shall sit on his white hause-banel [1];
I will pick out his boury[2] blue 'een;
Ye'll take a tress of his yellow hair
To theak[3] yere nest when it grows base;
The gowden[4] down on his young chin
Will do to sew my young ones in.

6. "Oh, cauld and base[5] will his bed be
When winter storms sing in the tree.
At his head a turf, at his feet a stone.
He will sleep, nor hear the maiden's moan.
O'er his white bones, the birds shall fly -
The wild deer bound, and foxes cry."

[1] Neck Bone.
[2] For Bonny. Cunningham has "bony".
[3] Thatch.
[4] Golden.
[5] Mistake for bare as also in stanza 5, line 4.

B. "The Three Black Crows." Obtained from Miss Mary Franklin, Crossnore, Avery County, North Carolina, August II, 1930.

1. There were three crows sat on a tree,
Old Billy McGaw McGee!
There were three crows sat on a tree,
Old Billy McGaw McGee!
There were three crows sat on a tree,
And they were black as crows could be,
And they all flapped their wings and cried,
"Caw! Caw! Caw!"
And they all flapped their wings and cried,
"Caw! Caw! Caw!"

2. "What shall we have for bread to eat?"
Old Billy McGaw McGee!
"On yonders hill there lies a horse."
Old Billy McGaw McGee!
"We'll perch ourselves on his backbone,
And pick his eyes out one by one;"
And they all clapped their wings and cried,
"Caw! Caw! Caw!"
And they all clapped their wings and cried,
"Caw! Caw! Caw!"

C. "Three Black Crows." Obtained from Mr. C. L. Franklin, Crossnore, Avery County, North Carolina, July 13, 1930.

1. There were three black crows
Sat in a tree.
Oh, Billy McGee McGaw!
And they were as black
As they could be.
Oh, Billy McGee McGaw!
They flapped their wings and crowed;
"Caw! Caw! Caw!"

3. THE CHERRY TREE CAROL Child, No. 54
Obtained from Miss Mary Wheeler, 504 Kentucky Avenue, Paducah, Kentucky, January 14, 1931. For American texts see Barry-Eckstorm-Smyth, p. 446; Campbell and Sharp, No. I3; Davis, No. 13; McGill, p. 60; Pound, No. 19 (McGill's text); Scarborough, pp. 6o-6i; Journal, XXIX, 293 and 294; XXX, 297; The Virginia Folk-Lore Society Bulletin, Nos. 4, 5.

1. Joseph was an old man,
An old man was he,
When he married Mary,
The Queen of Gallilee.

2. Joseph and Mary walked
Through a garden gay,
Where the cherries grew
Upon every tree.

3. And they heard while walking,
Angel voices sing,
"Lo, this night shall be born
Our Lord and Heavenly King.

4. "He neither shall be born
In a house nor a hall,
Nor in Paradise,
But within a stall."

4. BONNY BARBARA ALLAN. Child, No. 84.
A. "Barbara Allen".
Recorded by Mrs. Henry from the singing of Miss Mary Franklin, Crossnore, Avery County, North Carolina, July, 1929. This ballad was first printed in "The Tea-Table Miscellany," 1740, and next in Percey's "Reliques," I765. Reed Smith, No. 8, states ten texts have been discovered in South Carolina running from five to sixteen stanzas and declares, "Of all the ballads in America 'Barbara Allan' leads both in number of versions and number of tunes." He adds that it has appeared in ten song books and several broadsides. Cox, in his headnote, No. 16, says that twelve variants have been found in West Virginia. Campbell and Sharp, No. 21, give ten texts and ten tunes. C. Alphonso Smith quotes a Virginia version in "Ballads Surviving in the United States" (Musical Quarterly, 2, No. I, p. 120). James Watt Raine gives a Kentucky version of nineteen stanzas with tune in "The Land of the Saddle Bags" p. 115. Pound, No. 3, gives two versions, one from Missouri and one from North Carolina. See also Wyman and Brockway, p. 1; Adventure Magazine, March 10, 1925; ibid., March 10, 1926; New Jersey Journal of Education, Feb., 1927; Scarborough, 59; R. W. Gordon, New York Times Magazine, Oct. 9, 1927; Josephine McGill, "Folk Songs of the Kentucky Mountains", 40; Mackenzie, "The Quest of the Ballad", 100; Reed Smith ("South Carolina Ballads", Harvard University Press, 1928), 129; Barry-Eckstrom-Smyth, p. 195; Belden, No. 7; Davis, No. 24 (ninety-two versions have been found in Virginia); Mackenzie, Ballads and Sea Songs from Nova Scotia, No. 9; Barry, No. 22; Heart Songs, p. 247; Pound, Syllabus, p. 9; Sandburg, p. 57; Shearin and Combs, p. 8; Shoemaker, p. 122 (2nd edition); Bradley Kincaid, Favorite Mountain Ballads and Old Time Songs, p. 14; Hudson, Specimens of Mississippi Folk-Lore, No. 13. Note also the following references to the Journal: Edmands, VI, 132; Belden, XIX, 285;  Kittredge, XX, 256; Beatty, XXII, 63; Pound, XXVI, 352; Perrow, XXVIII, 144; Tolman, XXIX, 16o; Rawn and Peabody, XXIX, 198; Tolman and Eddy, XXXV, 343; Henry, XXXIX, 211; Hudson, XXXIX, 97; Henry, XLII, 268.

1. Early, early in the spring,
When the spring buds were a-swelling,
Sweet William Gray on his death bed lay
For the love of Barbra Allen.

2. He sent his servant to her town,
He sent him to her dwelling,
Saying, "Here's a message for the lady fair,
If your name be Barbra Allen."

3. Slowly, slowly she got up
And slowly she went to him
But all she said when she got there
Was, "Young man, I think you're dying."

4. "Oh, yes, I'm sick, I'm very sick,
And death is nigh me dwelling,
But never, no better will I ever be
Till I get Barbra Allen."

5. "Oh, yes, you're sick, you're very sick
And death is nigh you dwelling,
But never no better will you ever be
For you can't get Barbra Allen.

6. "Do you remember in yonders town
When we were all a-drinking,
You handed wine to ladies all,
But you slighted Barbra Allen ?"

7. "Yes, I remember in yonders town
When we were all a-drinking,
I handed wine to the ladies all,
But my love to Barbra Allen."

8. He turned his pale face to the wall;
He turned his back upon them:
"Adieu, adieu, fair friends, to all,
Be good to Barbra Allen."

9. Slowly, slowly, she got up
And slowly she went from him,
She had not gone but a mile in town,
Till she heard his death bell tolling.

10. She looked to the east, she looked to the west,
She saw his cold corpse coming:
"Hand me down, hand me down that corpse of clay,
That I may gaze upon him."

11. The more she gazed, the more she wept,
Till she burst out in sorrow:
"There is a young man that I could have saved,
If I had done my duty."

12. "Mother, O mother, go make my bed,
Make it both long and narrow;
Sweet William died for me today;
I'll die for him tomorrow.

13. "Father, O father, go dig my grave;
Dig it both long and narrow;
Sweet William died for me in love;
I'll die for him in sorrow."

14. Sweet William died on Saturday eve,
And Barbra died on Sunday;
Her mother died for love of both;
She died on Easter's Monday.

15. They buried William in one church yard,
And Barbra in another;
And from his grave there sprang a rose
And from her grave a briar.

16. They grew to the top of the old church tower
Till they could grow no taller;
They twined and twirled in a true love's knot;
The rose clung to the briar.

B. Recorded in July, 1930, by Mrs. Henry from the singing of Mrs.William Franklin, also of Crossnore, N. C., and the grandmother of Miss Mary Franklin. Mrs. Franklin says that she learned the song when she was a child. It is worthy of note that the elder could remember only a portion of the song whereas her granddaughter knows a fairly complete text.

1. Early, early in the spring
Green buds were a-swelling.
There was a young man taken down sick
For the love of Barbara Allen.

2. Sent his servants to her town;
Sent them to her dwelling, saying,
"There's a young man taken down sick
For the love of Barbara Allen."

3. Slowly, slowly she got up,
Slowly she went to him, saying,
"Young man you are very sick
And I think you are a-dying."

4. "Don't you remember in yonders town
We were a-drinking:
You hand a drink to all the young ladies
And slighted Barbara Allen?"

5. "Yes, I remember in yonders town
We were a-drinking:
I hand a drink to all the young ladies
And slighted Barbara Allen."

6. Slowly, slowly she got up,
Slowly she went from him.

C. Mrs. William Gavin Taylor, 6 Beech Street, Arlington, New Jersey, after listening to the two preceding versions, recalled hearing her mother of Boston, Massachusetts, sing the song, but could remember only the
two lines that follow:

"One kiss from me you ne'er shall have,"
Said cruel Barbarey Allen.

5. KING HENRY FIFTH'S CONQUEST OF FRANCE Child, 164.
A Traditional Ballad Not Hitherto Found in America. The following texts, A and B, of this ballad together with the headnotes are reprinted by courtesy of the New Jersey Journal of Education,  Vol. XX, nos. 3-4, pp. 6-7 and the Bulletin of the Folk-Song Society of the Northeast, Number 2, pp. 5-6. The tune is printed for the first time here (see B). In regard to the texts A and B from the same source Mr. Phillips Barry remarks (Bulletin, p. 6); "One feature of the tradition, the preservation of two texts in the same family, is easily accounted for. Mr. and Mrs. Harmon are step-brother and step-sister; they learned their songs from the same source, namely Grandfather Hicks, from whom, apparently, the Harmon songs have come. That 'ballads run in families' is a truism. Certain aspects, however, of family tradition require closer study. It would be worth while to know why some ballads and not others have accumulated in the tradition of a given family." In the summer of 1928, some traditional ballads had been recorded from the singing of members of the Harmon family of Cade's Cove, Tennessee. Others were taken down by some individuals of the family and forwarded by mail. One of the most interesting of the latter is a fine text of the rare "Lamkin". Meantime this entire family of Tennessee mountaineers, numbering more than a dozen persons, was compelled to sell their property holdings to the Great Smoky National Park Commission and to remove to the mountains of northern Georgia. Though rather inaccessible and quite isolated, a visit was contemplated by the writer to their new abode during the last summer for the purpose of recording a promised version of "The Gypsy Laddie". Then the unexpected happened. On the writer's return from a camping trip to Thunderhead the entire family suddenly appeared in Cade's Cove for a visit. "Uncle" Sam Harmon and his wife "Aunt" Polly spent the best part of two days singing at the mountain cabin of the writer. Twenty-four songs were recorded, many of them traditional ballads from England, for "Uncle" Sam's grandfather, Hicks, emigrated from England to Watauga County, North Carolina, at the age of four years. "Uncle" Sam himself came to Cade's Cove when he was a boy. Some of the songs recorded are: "The Lass of Roch Royal", "The Gypsy Laddie", "The Farmer's Curst Wife", "The Wife Wrapped in Wether's Skin", "The Yorkshire Bite", "The Cruel Mother", "The Two Sister" (two texts), "The Goodman", "The Mermaid", "Sweet Trinity", "Lady Alice", "Broomfield Hill", "The Bamboo Brier", "Home, Daughter, Home", "I Loved a Lass", "Two Little White Babes", "The Lexington Girl", "The Butcher Boy", "King Henry the Fifth's Conquest of France", the ballad below.

A. (A is the text, as written down by Mrs. Harmon.)

1. The tribute due from the King in France
Had not been paid for so long time.
Fal lal the ral roddle, fal lal day.

2. He called to him his trusty page,
"Trusty page," lo he called he,
"Now away to the King in France,
Ay, to the King in France now speed-lee."
Fal lal the ral roddle, fal lal day.

3. He come unto the King in France
And fell down on his bending knees,
"My master here for the tribute due that was due to him,
That had not been paid for so long a time."
Pal lal the ral roddle, fal lal day.

4. "Your master young and of a tender age,
Not fitting to come under my degree.
Here I will send him these three tennis balls
And along with them he may learn to play."
Fal lal the ral roddle, fal lal day.

5. He marched back to his own land,
And fell on his bending knees;
"What news, what news from the King in France,
What news you brought to me?"
Fal lal the ral roddle, fal lal day.

6. "He said my master was young and of a tender age,
Not fitting to come unto his degree,
And he would send you these three tennis balls,
And along with them you may learn to play."
Pal lal the ral roddle, fal lal day.

7. As they marched through France -
Their drums and fifes so merrilee -
"Yonder comes proud Henery."
Fal lal the ral roddle, fal lal day.

B. The variant B was recorded by Mrs. Henry from the singing of Mr. Harmon. Stanzas 2 to 6 and 8 and II of this variant are identical with the Child text. Stanzas 13 and 14 could not be recalled.

1. As the King lay musing on his bed, -
The King of France owed a tribute due --
A tribute due was due to him;
It hadn't been paid for so long a time.
Far laldry lol dalla, for lol de day.

2. He called for his lovely page,
His lovely page then called he;
Saying, "You must go to the King of France,
To the King of France, sir, ride speedily."
Far laldry lol dalla, for lol de day.

3. Oh, then went away this lovely page,
This lovely page then away sent he,
And when he came to the King of France,
Low he fell down on his bending knee.
Far laldry lol dally, for lol de day.

4. "My master greets you, worthy sir,
Ten ton of gold that is due to he,
That you will send him his tribute home,
Or in French land you soon will him see."
Far laldry lol dalla, for lol de day.

5. "Your master's young and of tender years,
Not fitten to come into my degree,
And I will send him three tennis balls,
That with them he may learn to play."
Far laldry lol dalla, for lol de day.

6. Oh, there returned this lovely page,
This lovely page then returned he,
And when he came to our gracious king,
Low he fell down on his bending knee,
Far laldry lol dalla, for lol de day.

7. "What news, what news you brung to me?
What news you brung to me?"
"No news, no news," says he,
"For with its news you'll never agree."
Far laldry lol dalla, for lol de day.

8. "He says you're young and of tender years,
Not fitten to come into his degree;
And he will send you three tennis balls,
That with them you may learn to play."
Far laldry lol dalla, for lo de day.

9. "Not a married man,
Not a widow's son;
Nor a widow's curse shan't go with me."
Far laldry lol dalla, for lol de day.

10. And then we marched into French land,
With drums and trumps so merrily;
And bespeaks the King of France,
"Yonder comes proud King Henery."
Far laldry lol dalla, for lol de day.

11. The first shot that the Frenchmen gave,
They killed our Englishmen so free;
We killed ten thousand of the French,
And the rest of them they ran away.
Far laldry lol dalla, for lol de day.

6. JAMES HARRIS (THE DAEMON LOVER) Child, No. 243.
A. "The House Carpenter."
Recorded by Mrs. Henry from the singing of Miss Ronie Johnson, Crossnore, Avery County, North Carolina, July 1929. Campbell and Sharp, No. 29, give eleven variants and tunes. Cox, No. 25, states that twenty-one variants have been found in West Virginia. Davis, No. 40, says that fifty-two texts and seven melodies have been found in Virginia. See also Barry, No. II; Barry-Eckstrom-Smyth, p. 304; Belden, No. ii; Hudson, No. 19; Pound, No. 17; Pound, Syllabus, p. Io; Sandburg, p. 66; Shearin, Sewanee  Review, July, 1911; Shearin and Combs, p. 8; C. Alphonso Smith, Musical Quarterly, January, 1916; Reed Smith, The Traditional Ballad and Its South Carolina Survivals, No. II; Reed Smith, South Carolina Ballads, No. 12. Note also the following in the Journal: Belden, XIX, 295; Kittridge, XX, 257; Barry, XXV, 274; Kittridge, XXX, 325 ; Tolman and Eddy, XXXV, 346; Pound, XXVI, 360; Henry, XLII, 274.

1. "Well met, well met, my own true love;
Well met, well met," said he.
"I'm just returning from the salt, salt sea,
And all for the love of thee.

2. "I will come in but I won't sit down,
For I haven't a moment's time;
I heard you were engaged to another young man
And your heart is no longer mine."

3. "Yes, come in and sit down
And stay a while if you can;
I am married to a house carpenter,
And I think he is a nice young man."

4. "If you will leave the house carpenter
And come along with me,
We will go where the grass grows green
On the banks of the deep blue sea in the land of sweet Willie."

5. She dressed herself in silk so fine,
Most glorious to behold,
And she marched up and down the street;
She shone like glittering gold.

6. She picked up her sweet little babe;
Kisses she gave it one, two, three,
Saying, "You stay at home with your poor old dad,
And keep him company."

7. She hadn't been gone but about two weeks;
I'm sure it were not three,
Till she fell down a-weeping on her true lover's lap,
And she wept most bitterly.

8. "Darling, are you weeping for my silver or gold?
Or weeping for my store?
Or weeping for your house carpenter
Whose face you shall see no more?"

9. "I'm neither weeping for silver or gold,
Or weeping for your store;
I'm just a-weeping for my sweet little babe,
That I'll never get to see any more."

10. "Oh, what are the white banks that I see?
They are white as any snow."
"They are the banks of heaven, my dear,
Where your sweet little babe shall go."

11. "Oh, what are the black banks that I see?
They are blacker than any crow."
"They are the banks of hell, my dear,
Where you and I must go."

12. She dressed herself in silk so fine,
Put on her blue and green,
And marched right out in front of him.
They took her to be some queen.

13. They hadn't been gone but about three weeks;
I'm sure it was not four,
Till her true lover's ship took a leak in it,
And sank for to rise no more.

14. Well, my house carpenter is still at home,
And living very well,
While my poor body is drowning in the sea,
And my soul is bound for hell.

B.  "House Carpenter". Obtained from Cleophas L. Franklin, Crossnore, Avery County, N. C., July 14, 1929, who had it from his great grandmother, Tilda Pyatte, of Avery County.

1. I once could have married a king's daughter,
And she would have married me;
But I forsaken the crown of gold -
Was all for the love of thee.

2. If you could have married the king's daughter,
I'm sure that you are to blame;
For I have married a house carpenter
And I think he's a nice young man.

3. If you'll forsake your house carpenter
And go along with me,
I'll take you to where the grass grows green
And the banks of sweet relief.

4. If I forsake my house carpenter
And go along with thee,
What have you to maintain me on
Or keep me from slavery?

5. I have five ships on the ocean wide
A sailing for dry land;
Five hundred and twenty bold seaman
Will be at your command.

6. She picked up her sweet little babe
And kisses gave it three,
Saying, "Go stay with your papa, my sweet little babe,
And keep him company."

7. She dressed herself in silk so fine
Most glorious to be seen.
As she walked along the shore -
Outshined the glittering sun.

8. But she had not been on the ship two weeks,
I'm sure it were not three,
Till she li-mented in her true-lover's ship
And wept most bitterly.

9. "Is it for my gold you weep?
Or is it for my store?
Or is it for your house carpenter
That you never shall see any more?"

10. "It is not for your gold I weep;
Nor it is not for your store.
I was just weeping for my sweet little babe,
That I never shall see any more."

11. She had not been on the ship three weeks,
I'm sure it were not four,
Till there sprang a leak in the true-lover's ship
And she sank to rise no more.

12. "A curse, a curse to all seamen,
A curse forever more!
They robbed me of my house carpenter
That I never shall see any more."

7. THE SWEET TRINITY (THE GOLDEN VANITY) Child, No. 286.
A. "The Merry Golden Tree".
Sung by Mrs. Samuel Harmon, Cade's Cove, Blount County, Tennessee, August 13, 1930. Recorded by Mrs. Henry. This is one of the songs that came as a surprise in the summer of 1930.
The Harmons had given the impression in the summer of 1928 that they had sung all the songs that they knew. Mrs. Harmon says that she learned this song as a child. She probably had it from her husband (she married at the age of 12) who learned most of his songs from his grandfather on his mother's side, "Grand-Daddy" Hicks. He came from England in his fourth year.

For American texts, see Barry, No. I; Belden, No. 78; Campbell and Sharp, No. 35; Colcord, p. 79; Cox, No. 32; Davis, No. 47; Barry-Eckstorm- Smyth, p. 339; Hudson, No. 22; Journal, XVIII, 125 (Barry); XXIII, 429 (Belden); XXX, 331 (Kittredge); McGill, p.97; Pound, Ballads, No. Io; Shearin and Combs, p. 9; Shoemaker, p.126 (Second Ed.); Wyman and Brockway, p. 72. The present song is nearest in its wording to the Kentucky version of Wyman and Brockway. Cf. the English version with music in Sharp's One Hundred English Folksongs, No. 14. Cox points out that "A fragment of this ballad, combined with an additional stanza of a comic character, has been popular as a college song" and supplies the following references: "Waite, Carmina Colligensia (Boston, Cop. 1868), p. 171; The American College Songster (Ann. Arbor, 26 7ournal of American Folk-Lore. 1876), p. 101; white, Student Life in Song (Boston, Cop. 1879), p. 58." A fine text of the original ballad with the tune will be found in J. W. Raine's, The Land of the Saddle-Bags, p. 121. For a modern version of "The Golden Vanity" see John Masefield's A Sailor's Garland p. 175.

1. There was a little ship
In the North Amerikee
And it went by the name of
The Merry Golden Tree,
As she sailed on the lonesome Lowlands, low,
As she sailed on the lonesome sea.

2. There was another ship
In the North Amerikee
And she went by the name of
The Turkey Revelee
And she sailed on the lonesome Lowlands low,
And she sailed on the lonesome sea.

3. "O captain, O captain,
What will you give to me
To go and sink yon Turkey Revelee
And sink her in the sea,
As she sails on the lonesome Lowlands low,
As she sails on the lonesome sea?"

4. "I'll give you money,
I'll pay your fee;
I have a loving daughter that
I'll marry unto thee,
If you sink her in the lonesome Lowlands low,
If you sink her in the lonesome sea."

5. He bowed to his breast
And away swam he
He swum till he come
To the Turkey Revelee,
As she sailed on the lonesome Lowlands low,
As she sailed on the lonesome sea.

6. He had a little tool
That was fitten for to rule
And he bored nine holes
All in her hull at once,
As she sailed on the lonesome Lowlands low,
As she sailed on the lonesome sea.

7. There was some a-playing cards
And some a-playing check
And some was a-dancing on
The salt water deck,
As he sank her in the lonesome Lowlands low,
As he sank her in the lonesome sea.

8. They some with their hats
And some with their caps,
Trying to stop those
Salt water gaps,
As they sunk her in the lonesome Lowlands low,
As they sunk her in the lonesome sea.

9. He bowed to his breast
And away swum he.
He swum till he came to
The Merry Golden Tree,
As she sailed in the lonesome Lowlands low,
As she sailed in the lonesome sea.

10. "0 captain, O captain,
You good as your word?
Will you take me
Up on board ?
For I've sunk her in the lonesome Lowlands Low,
Oh, I've sunk her in the lonesome sea."

11. "I'll never be
As good as my word;
Nor neither will I take you
Up on board,
For you've sunk her in the lonesome Lowlands low,
Lord, you've sunk her in the lonesome sea."

12. "If it wasn't for the love
That I have for your men,
I'd do unto you
As I've done unto them;
I would sink you in the lonesome Lowlands low,
I would sink you in the lonesome sea."

13. He bowed to his breast
And away swum he;
He bidden farewell to
The Merry Golden Tree,
As he sunk in the lonesome Lowlands low,
As he sunk in the lonesome sea.

B. "The Golden Willow Tree." Recorded by Mrs. Henry from the singing of Mrs. Ewart Wilson, Pensacola, North Carolina, August I, I930. "The Long Brown Path" in The New York Evening Post (p. 7) for August 22, 1930, has the following account: "Our unique experience came last Thursday when we sought out Big Tom Wilson's place on Cane River at the western base of Mount Mitchell. The road will not appear on the maps. Finding no one at home, we drove four miles to Ewart Wilson's, Big Tom's grandson. The wife of Ewart Wilson is one of the brightest, keenest and best educated women we have ever found in the mountains. We soon got her interested in singing and ended with a bag of more than a dozen songs, three of them traditional ballads of the rarest kind." For the story of Big Tom Wilson, the great hunter of the Black Mountains and the man who led the search for Prof. Mitchell at the time that he lost his life while taking observation on the mountains, see "The Saga of the Carolina Hills" by Hodge Mathes in The Christian Observer, July 9, 1930. Also see "Ewart Wilson's Road - Building Feat Astounds. Remarkable Mountaineer Tells of Father's Unique Career" by Ida Briggs Henderson in The Sunday Citizen, Asheville, N. C., July 20, I930. The father's name is Adolph ("Dolph") and he and his wife still maintain a mountain inn at Pensacola, N. C. "Dolph" came to his son's home during the course of the evening and gave interesting information about the mountain people. Mrs. Ewart Wilson remembers her mother's singing this song when she was a child. She says that she is sure that the ship that was sent to the bottom was the Golden Willow Tree and not the Turkey Revelee because she remembers as a child feeling sad that a ship with so pretty a name as Golden Willow Tree had to be sunk.

1. There was a ship a-sailing the sea,
That went by the name of the Turkey Revelee,
As it sailed on the low and the lonesome below,
As it sailed on the lonesome sea.

2. They hadn't been sailing but two weeks or three
Till they were overtaken by the Golden Willow Tree,
As it sailed on the low and the lonesome below,
As it sailed on the lonesome sea.

3. "I have houses, I have land
And I have a daughter at your command,
If you'll sink her in the low and the lonesome below,
If you'll sink her in the lonesome sea."

4. He turned on his breast and swimming went he
Till he came up to the Golden Willow Tree,
And he sank them in the low and the lonesome below,
And he sank them in the lonesome sea.

(Two stanzas could not be recalled, but Mrs. Wilson rememberst hat when the sailor returned, he was refused his reward).

7.
He turned on his back and sinking went he,
Bidding farewell to the Turkey Revelee,
As he sank in the low and the lonesome below,
As he sank in the lonesome sea.

8. THE YORKSHIRE BITE (Cf. Child, No. 283).
A. Recorded by Mrs. Henry from the singing of Mrs. Lee Johnson, Pyatt, North Carolina, July, 1930. Mrs. Johnson obtained the song from her brother, Monty, who learned it at a logging camp at Wilson Creek, N. C. For this parallel of "The Crafty Farmer" see Combs, Folk-Songs du Midi des Etats-Unis, p. 149 (a West Virginia text in which a South Carolina man's Negro servant is praised by his master for putting upon a Virginia villain "A South Carolina Bite"); Barry-Eckstorm-Smyth, p. 406 (three versions); Barry, Journal, XXIII, 451;  Kittredge, Journal, XXX, 367.

1. "Come down, come down," said the farmer to his son,
"To make you some money" (and his name was John.)
"Here's a cow you can take her to the fair.
She's in good order and it's her I can spare."
Like tothers - tothers -
Come - a - ran - tan - e - o.

2. He took that cow and he started to the fair;
Hadn't been gone long till he met with a man;
Hadn't been gone long till he met with a man;
He sold that cow for six pounds of tan.
Like tothers - tothers -
Come - a - ran - tan - e - o.

3. He went down to the bar-room to get him a drink;
The money was paid right down in chink;
There was a lady all dressed so fine;
She sewed that money in his coat line.
Like tothers - tothers -
Come - a - ran - tan - e - o.

4. The boy got out and he started for his home;
The robbers they mounted and they come following on.
"If you are going down the road for a few miles,
Hop on behind and we'll both take a ride."
Like tothers - tothers -
Come -a - ran - tan - e - o.

5. Hadn't been gone more than a mile that way
Till robbers said, "I'll tell you in plain;
It's your money I want without any strife;
If I don't get it, I'll end your sweet life."
Like tothers - tothers -
Come - a - ran - tan - e - o.

6. The boy ran his hands in his pockets and pulled his money out.
In a high patch of weeds he strew it all about
And the robber jumped off to pick up the loss
And the boy jumped in the saddle and rode off with the horse.
Like tothers - tothers -
Come - a - ran - tan - e - o.

7. "Come back, come back," the robber he roared;
"Come back, come back," the robber he roared;
"Come back, come back," the robber he roared;
"I'll give you your own and ten thousand more."
Like tothers - tothers -
Come - a - ean - tan - e - o.

8. The boy rode on to the old man's door;
The old man came out with a stamp on the floor;
Said, "Son, oh, son, ain't it a curse,
That our old cow's turned off to a horse ?"
Like tothers - tothers -
Come - a - ran - tan - e - o.

9. The boy run his hand in his pocket and begun to unfold;
He had ten thousand in silver and gold;
The old man begin to puff and he begin to swell.
"Daddy don't you think I sold your cow well ?"
Like tothers - tothers -
Come - a - ran - tan - e - o.

B. Obtained from Mrs. Mary Tucker, Varnell, Georgia, November 5, 1930. Mary Tucker is the daughter of Mr, and Mrs. Samuel Harmon, Cade's Cove, Tennessee.

1. "Come down, come down,"
Said the father to his son.
"We will make some money,
Or lose some one."
Lye teller tum rag,
Tum around tummy O!

2. "I have a old cow;
You can take her to the fair;
She is in good order;
You can sell her there."
Lye teller tum rag,
Tum around tummy O!

3. This boy tuk his cow
And he tuk her to the fair;
She was in good order
And he sold her there.
Lye teller tum rag,
Tum around tummy O!

4. He was afraid
The wild robbers would find;
He sewed up his money
In his coat line.
Lye teller tum rag,
Tum around tummy O!

5. There was a lady
In her silk so fine
Seen him sew up his money
In his old coat line.
Lye teller tum rag,
Tum around tummy O!

6. It wasn't very long
Till the wild robber followed on;
He knowed this money
Was in the boy's coat line.
Lye teller tum rag,
Tumranr ound tummy O!

7. "Son, O son,
I want your money without any strife
And if I don't get it,
I will end your life."
Lye teller tum rag,
Turn around tummy O!

8. The boy began to rake
To get his money out -
A big patch of weeds -
And he sowed all about.
Lye teller tum rag,
Tum around tummy O!

9. While the robber was down
Picking up the loss,
The boy jumped in his saddle -
Rode off with his horse.
Lye teller tum rag,
Tum around tummy O!

10. "Come back, come back,"
The wild robber did a-roar,
"You can have your money back
And ten times more."
Lye teller tum rag,
Tum around tummy O!

11. The boy rode on
To his father's door;
He jumped off
With a pump on the floor.
Lye teller turn rag,
Tum around tummy O!

12. "Son, O son,
Has it come to occur
That our old cow
Has turned to a horse?"
Lye teller turn rag,
Tum around O!

13. "No, the wild robbers
Robbed of my silver and gold
And while he was down picking up the loss,
I jumped in his saddle, rode off with his horse."
Lye teller tum rag,
Tum around tummy O!

14. They come in the saddle
To umfold
And out of the saddle
A thousand pounds of gold.
Lye teller tum rag,
Tum around tummy O!

15. The boy jumped up
With a pump on the floor -
Says, "I got my money back
And ten times more,"
Lye teller tum rag,
Tum around tummy O!

9. LITTLE DICKY WHIGBURN
Recorded by Mrs. Henry from the recitation and singing of Mr. Samuel Harmon, Cades' Cove, Blount County, Tennessee, August, 1930. Phillips Barry says of Little Dicky Whigburn, "It is the only version, as far as I know, in English, of a cante-fable widely current in central, eastern and southern Europe, the German form of which is 'Der Alte Hildebrand' ". It is reprinted here by courtesy of the Bulletin of the Folk- Song Society of the Northeast, Number 3, for the sake of the tune which is now published for the first time.

In London there was a spring noted for its healing qualities. The wife pretends she is sick and sends Dicky for a bottle of the water. She sings the first stanza as a signal that Dicky has gone and that the pastor can come from his hiding place.

1. [Lady sings]
"Little Dicky Whigburn to London is gone
To bring me a bottle of clear applesom -
Through the green woods and the willows,
Through the green woods and the willows."

2. [Pastor sings:]
"Oh, little does Dicky know, or little does he think
Who eats of his eats or drinks of his drinks;
And God spare me my life,
This night I'll stay with his wife
Through the green woods and the willows.

A peddler comes along, who has just met Dickie on his way to the spring. When he sees the pastor and hears the wife singing he understands what is up, hurries back to catch Dickie and persuades him to get in the hopsack and allow himself to be taken back home. As they reach the house, the peddler sings out stanza 3.

3. [Peddler sings:]
"Oh, Dicky Whigburn he's not fur
And out of my hopsack I'll have him appear;
And if a friend he does lack,
I'll stand at his back,
Through the green woods and the willows."

4. [Dicky gets out of hopsack]
"Good morning, fair gentleman all in a row;
The chief of your secret I very well know."
They beat the old pastor and right straight away;
They whipped Dicky's wife the very next way
And Dicky and the Peddler together did stay.

10. TWELVE APOSTLES (The Ten Commandments).
"The Two Little White Babes". Recorded by Mrs. Henry from the singing of Mrs. Samuel Harmon, Cade's Cove, Blount County, Tennessee, August, 1930. Cf. Shearin and Combs, p. 34; Campbell and Sharp, No. 299.


1. Two of them were lily white babes -
Oh, to my one - to my wandering
All alone -
Never more shall be so.

2. Three of them were strivers;
Two of them were lily white babes -
Oh, to my one - to my wandering
All alone -
Never more shall be so.

3. Four are the bambrews o'er the bow;
Three of them were strivers;
Two of them were lily white babes -
Oh, to my one - to my wandering
All alone
Never more shall be so.

4. Five the bambrew makers;
Four are the bambrews o'er the bow;
Three of them were strivers;
Two of them were lily white babes -
Oh, to my one - to my wandering
All alone -
Never more shall be so.

5. Six are the ablers' angles;
Five the bambrew makers;
Four are the bambrews o'er the bow;
Three of them were strivers;
Two of them were lily white babes -
Oh, to my one - to my wandering
All alone -
Never more shall be so.

6. Seven are the seven stars fixed in the sky;
Six are the ablers' angles;
Five are the bambrew makers;
Four are the bambrews o'er the bow;
Three of them were strivers;
Two of them were lily white babes -
Oh, to my one - to my wandering
All alone
Never more shall be so.

7. (Does not remember).

8. Nine both bright and shiny;
Seven are the seven stars fixed in the sky;
Six are the ablers' angles;
Five the bambrew makers;
Four are the bambrews o'er the bow;
Three of them were strivers;
Two of them were lily white babes -
Oh, to my one - to my wandering
All alone -
Never more shall be so.

9: Ten are the Ten Commandments;
Nine both bright and shiny;
Seven are the seven stars fixed in the sky;
Six are the ablers' angles;
Five the bambrew makers;
Four are the bambrews o'er the bow;
Three of them were strivers;
Two of them were lily white babes -
Oh, to my one - to my wandering
All alone
Never more shall be so.

11. JOHNNY TROY
"Song of a Hero".
Obtained from Miss Rachel Tucker, granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Harmon, Varnell, Georgia. See Journal, XXVII, 91.

1. Come all of you young heroes
And highways of the land.
Who wants to live in prison
And die a convict man?

2. I tell to you a story
Of the most badest boy:
The country knew him
By the name of John Detroy.

3. John Detroy and Jack,
Frank and Dun
Was four of the noblest heroes
Old England ever sprung.

4. For the robbery of a widow
Translated over in Spain
Got three long years in prison
To wear the convict chains.

5. There was hundred and forty
Serving out their terms,
Some of them for murder,
And some for smaller crimes.

6. John Detroy being among them
He most solemn swear:
"This very night I free you all,
Or, John Detroy, be no more."

7. We break and smith the hand cuffs
And cry for louder joy.
We break and smith the hand cuffs
And pull for yonders shore.

8. There were four armed guards
Watching around and about.
Much they were surprised
When John Detroy started out.

9. Much they were surprised
When he made his raid.
Three of the guards
Went jolly to their graves.

10. John Detroy turned
To go upon his way.
He looked and saw a poor man
And unto him did say.

11. "Your gold watch and money
I really demand
And if you fail to give it
Your life lies in my hands."

12. "I have no watch or money,"
The poor man replied.
"I have a happy family
Each day to provide."

13. "I been cast out of Shamrock,
For being a bad, bad boy;
But if this is so, you shan't be hurt,"
Cried John Detroy.

14. John Detroy was now captured
And then sentenced to die
On tenth of April,
On his scaffold high.

15. His friend and all that knew him
Cried for louder joy:
"Here goes our brave young hero
By name of John Detroy."

12. YOUNG EDMUND
Obtained from Mrs. William Franklin, Avery County, North Carolina, July, 1930. See Campbell and Sharp, No. 46; Mackenzie, Ballads and Sea Songs from Nova Scotia, p. 92; Wyman and Brookway, Twenty Kentucky
Mountain Songs, p. 42; Cox, No. 106; Journal, XX, 274; XXXV, 421-423.
[See also: Young Edward; Drunkard's Dream]

1. "My father keeps a public house
On yonders river side.
Go ye, go there and enter in
And there this night abide.

2. "Beware you tell them not your name;
Nor neither let them know
Your name it is young Edmund
Who drove in the low-lands low."

3. Young Edmund fell to drinking
About time to go to bed;
And little did he think that a sword that night
Would part his neck and head.

4. Her name, it was young Emma,
Who dreamed a frightful dream.
She dreamed that her old true-love
Was gone never to return again.

5. "Oh, mother, oh, dear mother,
You may think it wrong or right.
I'm going to find my driver boy,
Who came here to stay last night."

6. "Oh, daughter, oh, dear daughter,
His gold will make a show;
We sent his body a-drinking away
Down in the low-lands low."

7. "Oh, father, oh, dear father,
You'll make a public show
For murdering of my driver boy,
Who drove in the low-land low."

8. The fish that swims in the ocean
Floats over my true-love's breast.
His body's in a general motion
And I hope he is at rest.

13. HOME, DEARIE, HOME.
A. "Home, Daughter, Home".
Recorded by Mrs. Henry from the singing of Mrs. Samuel Harmon, Cade's Cove, Blount County, Tennessee, August 13, 1930. Cf. Joanna C. Colcord, Roll and Go Songs of American Sailormen, p. 87.

1. It's home, daughter, home,
And it's home you ought to be;
It's home, daughter, home,
In your own countree.
Where the oak and the ash
And the fine willow tree,
All a-growing green
In the North Amerikee.

2. There came a jolly sailor
To my house to lodge.
He called for a candle
To light him to bed.
He called for a candle
To light him to bed
And likewise a napkin
To bind up his head.

3. I lit him to bed
Like I ought for to do
And says, "Pretty girl,
Wont you jump in too?"
I jumped in behind him
To keep myself warm,
Thinking a sailor
Wouldn't do me any harm.

4. 'Long about the middle of the night
He grew very bold
And into my apron
He threw handful of gold.
The gold hit glistened
And it shined so bright
It caused me to sleep
With the sailor all night.

5. But if I have baby,
What I am the worse?
The gold in my apron
And the money in my purse.
The gold in my apron
For to buy it milk and bread;
That's what I got for lighting
A sailor to bed.

6. I'll buy me a nurse
And I'll pay the nurse's fee;
I'll buy me a nurse
And I'll pay the nurse's fee;
I'll buy me a nurse
And I'll pay the nurse's fee;
And I'll pass for some maid
In a furrin countree.

7. If it's a boy,
He shall run the raging sea
With a little starry fold cap
And a roundabout so blue,
Fighting to free the niggers
Like his daddy used to do.

8. If it's a boy,
He shall fight for its king;
And if it's a girl
It shall wear a gold ring.
She shall wear a gold ring
With a top-knot so blue
And crawl to bed with sailors
Like its mother used to do.

B. "Home in the Old Country". Also recorded by Mrs. Henry from the singing of Mr. C. L. Franklin, Crossnore, Avery County, North Carolina, July 6, 1930.

1. The sailor was sick
And he hung down his head -
Asked the little maiden
Would she light him to bed.

2. She lit him to the bed
Like a maiden ought to.
He said, "My little honey,
Won't you come to bed too?"

3. The sailor jumped up
So brave and so bold.
In her apron he throwed
A handful of gold.

4. Gold shine so bright -
A dollar and a half.
"Will you marry me ?"
The little maiden cried.

5. "Home, my little girl,
Home you ought to be -
Dearest home
In the old countree."
(Mr. Franklin would sing no more.)

14. DERBY RAM
A. "The Old Big Sheep".
Recorded by Mrs. Henry from the singing of Mrs. Samuel Harmon, Cade's Cove, Blount County, Tennessee, August 12, 1930. See Joanna C. Colcord's Roll and Go Songs of American Sailormen, p. 68; Journal, XVIII, 51; XXXVI, 377; XXXIX, 173. Add Lunsford and Stringfield 30o and I Folksongs, New York.

1. As I went to market, sir,
One market day,
I saw as big a ram, sir,
As ever fed on hay.
Tam-a-fare randy dotty, tam-a-fare randy day,
Tam-a-fare randy dotty, tam-a-fare randy day.

2. He was so big, sir,
He neither could walk nor stand
And every foot he had, sir,
Covered an acre of land.
Tam-a-fare randy dotty, tam-a-fare randy day,
Tam-a-fare randy dotty, tam-a-fare randy day.

3. And the wool on his belly, sir,
Dragged to the ground.
The wolves builded a den there
And I heard the young'n's growl.
Tam-a-fare randy dotty, tam-a-fare randy day,
Tam-a-fare randy dotty, tam-a-fare randy day.

4. The wool on his back, sir,
Reached to the sky
And the eagles built a nest there
For I heard the young'ns' cry.
Tam-a-fare randy dotty, tam-a-fare randy day,
Tam-a-fare randy dotty, tam-a-fare randy day.

5. The wool between his horns, sir,
I think it very fine;
It warped forty yards of cloth, sir,
About the size of twine.
Tam-a-fare randy dotty, tam-a-fare randy day,
Tam-a-fare randy dotty, tam-a-fare randy day.

6. His horns did grow so high, sir,
They did reach the sky.
He made a pulpit, sir,
And fetched a preacher for to preach.
Tam-a-fare randy dotty, tam-a-fare randy day,
Tam-a-fare randy dotty, tam-a-fare randy day.

7. The first tooth he had, sir,
As big as saddle horns;
And the next tooth he had, sir,
Helt forty barrels of corn-
Tam-a-fare randy dotty, tam-a-fare randy day,
Tam-a-fare randy dotty, tam-a-fare randy day.

8. The man that killed the ram, sir,
Was drownded in his blood,
And the boy that helt the bowl, sir,
Was washed away in the flood.
Tam-a-fare randy dotty, tam-a-fare randy day,
Tam-a-fare randy dotty, tam-a-fare randy day.

9. The blood it run nine miles, sir,
If it run no more;
And turned as big a mill, sir,
As ever turned before.
Tam-a-fare randy dotty, tam-a-fare randy day,
Tam-a-fare randy dotty, tam-a-fare randy day.

10. The man that owned the mill, sir,
I think is very rich;
And the boy who made this song, sir,
Is a lying son of a bitch.
Tam-a-fare randy dotty, tam-a-fare randy day,
Tam-a-fare randy dotty, tam-a-fare randy day.

B. Derby Ram
Mr. William Maxwell Barclay, of 395 Brook Avenue, Passaic, New Jersey, after listening to the preceding song sang the following version. Mr. Barclay learned the song in Scotland thirty years ago.

1. There was a ram - he had such horns
They grew up to the sky;
The eagles built their nest up there
And you could hear them cry.

Chorus: It's a lie, sir, it's a lie -
A most confounded lie;
If you had been where we have been,
You'd say the same as I.

2. And when this ram was killed, sir,
It lost so very much blood,
That five and twenty sailor boys
Were carried away in the flood.
Chorus:

3. The man who owned this ram, sir,
He must have been very rich;
And the man who sings about the ram
Is a lying son-of-a-bitch.
Chorus:

15. THE THREE SONS
"Song Ballet". Obtained from Mrs. Hiram Proctor, Varnell, Georgia, November, 1930. Mrs. Proctor is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Harmon, of Cade's Cove, Tennessee. See Sharp, One Hundred English Folksongs, p. 180.

1. Three boys was turned out of doors
Because they could not sing.

2. And one of them was a weaver;
And one of them was a miller;
And the other one was a little tailor boy;
And they all three raged together.

3. And the weaver he stole yarn;
And the miller he stole corn;
And the little tailor boy stole broadcloth
To keep the three boys warm.

4. And the miller was drowned in his pond;
And the weaver was hung in his yarn;
And the devil flew away with the little tailor boy
With his broadcloth under his arm.

16. THE BUGABOO
"The Buggerboo". Obtained from Mrs. Samuel Harmon, Cade's Cove, Blount County, Tennessee, October, 1930. See Combs, Folk-Songs du Midi des Etats- Unis, p. 214.

1. My love come to my bed side;
So bitterly she did weep;
At last she jumped in the bed with me;
She was afraid of the buggerboo.

2. All in the first part of that night
Me and my love did play;
All in the latter part of that night
She rolled in my arms till day.

3. The night being gone
And the day a-coming on:
"Wake up, wake up, my own true love,
For the buggerboo done gone."

4. All in the first part of that year
She blushed in the face;
All in the latter part of that year
Grew thicker through the waist.

5. And about nine months afterwards
She brought forth me a fine son
And you can see as well as me
What the buggerboo has done.

6. In a year or two I married that girl;
She made me a virtuous wife;
I never told her of her faults
In all days of my life.

7. I never told her of her faults;
Bedog my eyes if I do!
But every time the baby cries
I think of the buggerboo.

17. THE BRAMBLE BRIAR
"The Bamboo Brier". Recorded by Mrs. Henry from the singing of Mrs. Samuel Harmon, Cade's Cove, Blount County, Tennessee, August, 193o, who learned it from grandfather Harmon. See Cox, No. 88; Pound, No. 22; Journal, XXIX, 168; XXXV, 359; Belden, Publications of the Modern Language Association, XXXIII, 327. Ballads and Folk-Songs from the Southern Highlands. 49 Cf. also Belden, The Sewanee Review, April, 1911; Shearin, The Sewanee Review, July, 1911; Barry, No. 49.

1. It was earl-i, earl-i in the morning
When those young men became a-hunting,
They hunted over hills and lonesome valleys
And through such places as was quite unknown.

2. Till at last they came to the Bamboo Brier
And then her true love was killed and thrown.
It was getting late when they was turning.
"O, brother dear, where my servant man can be?"

3. "Among my hunt and all our rambles
We have lost you servant man there."

4. It was earl-i, earl-i the next morning -
This young damsel became a-hunting.
She traveled over hills and through lonesome valleys
And through such places as was quite unknown.

5. At last she came to the Bamboo Brier.
There her true-love was killed and thrown;
The blood on his cheeks was just a-drying;
His feeble lips was salt as brine.

6. She kissed him o'er and over a-crying:
"I have lost a bosom friend of mine."
It was getting late when she was returning:
"Sister, dear, where have you been?"

7. "Oh, ye, oh, ye, ye cruel villians!
For my true love you both shall hang."
They started to the sea for to drown all sin and sorrow.
The top of the ship became in a totter
And in the bottom of the sea their graves lie low.

18. THE WEAVER HAD A WIFE
No local title. Obtained from Mrs. Samuel Harmon, Varnell, Georgia, formerly of Cade's Cove, Tennessee, October, 1930. Shoemaker has a song entitled, "Will the Weaver", p. 130 (2nd edtion), in which Will the Weaver is the one that hides from the husband. The latter has just married a woman who swears "That she will the breeches wear."

1. The weaver had a wife
And the major loved her dearly;
And to her bed side
He appeard both late and early.

2. The weaver a-being away from home -
Away from home a-drinking -
The major come in
With his gay gold guinea jingling.

3. The weaver come home within the night
Which made them hurry, scurry.
"Where must I hide?" the major cried,
"This is too bold a venture."

4. "You may hide under my bed side
Before I let him in."

5. "Oh, ho! my loving husband,
For you I have been longing.
I have rolled my bed from side to side
For the want of you, my darling."

6. He got up late in the night
And through a grand mistake
He surely made,
He put on the major's breeches.

7. As he rode along he spied a gold watch
By his side, and guineas he had twenty.
He clasped his [hand] in his pocket
And found he had money plenty.

8. And then he saw his mistake:
That he had on the major's breeches:
And now I will return to my wife;
Perhaps she has got better.

9. He jumped and caroused all over the floor.
"Good lord, how my breeches does glitter!"
My wife lay sobbing on the old -
"With you I have been evil."

10. She cursed them breeches in her heart
And wished [them] to the devil.
"Oh, ho! my dear wife, unto [you] I wager,
I'm as fit to wear these breeches as you are for the major."

19. THE SHEFFIELD APPRENTICE
Recorded by Mrs. Henry from the singing of Mrs. Samuel Harmon, Cade's Cove, Blount County, Tennessee, August 13, 1930, who learned it from John Goolder Harmon, father of Samuel Harmon. See Campbell and Sharp, No. 97; Journal, XXVIII, 164; Shearin, Sewanee Review, XIX, 320; Bradley Kincaid's Favorite Old-Time Songs and Mountain Ballads, Book 3, p. 18, Chicago, 1930.

1. I was brought up in England -
A note of high degree;
My parents doted on me;
They had no child but me.

2. I rolled in so much pleasure -
Till the age of twenty-three.

3. I did not like my master;
He did not treat me well;
I formed a resolution
With him I will not dwell.

4. As I went through Holland
A lady I did spy;
She offered me great wages
To came and live with her.

5. To come and live in Holland
And serve her for one year.

6. I had not been in Holland
More than months two or three
Till my young mistress
Grew very fond of me.

7. Her gold and her silver,
Her house and her land.
If I would consent to marry her,
Would be at my command.

8. "Oh, no, my young mistress,
I cannot wed you both.
I can wed none but Pretty Polly,
Your charming chamber maid."

9. She turned away in angry;
She swore as she left me
She'd prove my overthrow.

10. I was out in my mistress' garden
A-viewing her flowers fair -

11. A gold ring from my mistress' finger,
As she passed me by,
She slipped it in my pocket
And for that I must die.

12. I was brought before some cruel judge
And must answer for my fault.
Long time I pled "not guilty",
But what did that prevail?

13. My mistress said I robbed her
And they plunged me into jail.

14. Come, all you young people
That's standing round this place,
Don't glory in my downfall;
Nor laugh at my disgrace.

15. It's fare you well, young people,
As I bid this world adieu;
It's fare you well, Pretty Polly,
I died for loving you.

20. THE BROWN GIRL Cf. Child, No. 295.
See Campbell and Sharp, No. 36; Barry, Journal, XXVII, 73. "Doctor". Recorded by Mrs. Henry from the singing of Mrs. Samuel Harmon, Cade's Cove, Blount County, Tennessee, August, 1930.

1. There was a ship captain
That sailed on the sea;
He called on Miss Betsy;
Pretty Polly did say:
"You go to that sea captain
And grant me love or ruined I'll be."

2. As Miss Betsy started
Pretty Polly did beery:
"Make haste, pretty Betsy,
Or I will die."

3. She came to the sea captain
And said unto him:
"Are you the young man -
You love so well?"

4. He said unto her;
"Am I the doctor
That can kill or cure?"

5. "You go to that young man
Tell he come unto me,
And grant me his love
Or ruined I will be."

6. "Am I the doctor
You sent for her
Or am I the young man
Who you love so dear?"

7. "You are the doctor
That can kill or cure;
Without your assistance
I am ruined I am sure."

21. THE DROWSY SLEEPER.
This first stanza of "The Drowsy Sleeper" was obtained from Mrs. C. L. Franklin, Crossnore, Avery County, North Carolina, August, 1930.  See Campbell and Sharp, No. 47; Sturgis and Hughes, Songs from the Hills of Vermont, p. 30; Sharp, Folk-Songs of English Origin Collected in the Appalachian Mountains, Second Series, p. 48; Cox, No. io8; Journal, XX, 260; XXIX, 200; XXX, 338.

1. Wake, oh, wake, you drowsy sleeper;
Wake, oh, wake, it's almost day.
Can you sleep and slumber
And your true-love's going away?

22. THE DRUNKARD'S HELL
A. "The Drunkard's Dream".
Recorded by Mrs. Henry from the singing of Mrs. William Franklin, Crossnore, Avery County, North Carolina, July, 1930. See Lomax, Cowboy Songs and Other Frontier Ballads, p. 395.

1. It was a dark and starless night
I thought [I] saw a gulf
Where all the drunkards go.

2. I raised my head and heard them tell:
This is the place where drunkards dwell.
I heard another mournful sound
Amid a group still lower down.

3. Around them stood a weeping crowd
With faces pale and voices loud.
They gnashed their teeth and cried and groaned:
"This is the whiskey sellers' home."

4. I traveled on, got there at last;
I thought I'd take one social glass;
I poured it out and stirred it well,
And then I thought of a drunkard's hell.

5. I dashed it out and left the place,
And bowed my head to redeeming grace;
The very moment faith regained -
Ten thousand joys around me sprang.

6. I went home to change my life
And to see my long neglected wife;
I found her kneeling by the bed
Because her infant babe was dead.

7. I told her not to cry and weep
Because our babe was just asleep.
Its happy soul had fled away
To dwell with Christ through endless days.

8. I took her by a pale white hand;
She was so weak she could not stand;
I sit her down and prayed a prayer
That God would own our Blossom there.

9. They took me through a temperance band;
They met me with a social hand;
Five sober years have passed away
Since first I bowed my knees to pray.

10. And now I'm living a sober life;
And have a good home and a loving wife.
Oh, may the legislative band
Enact good laws throughout the land!

11. And stop all whiskey sellers' course
From the mountain to the coast
And then the drunkard's cry will flee
And save the land eternally.

B. "Drunken Dream". It is interesting to note variations, however slight, as sung by different members of the same family. This song was also recorded by Mrs. Henry. It was sung by Miss Juanita Franklin, the daughter of Mrs. William Franklin, at Crossnore in 1929.

1. 'Twas a dark and starless night;
I dreamed I saw an awful sight:
I thought I saw a gulf below
Where all the dying drunkards go.

2. I raised my head and heard them tell
This is the place where drunkards dwell;
I heard another mournful sound
Amid a group still lower down.

3. Around them stood a weeping crowd
With faces pale and voices loud;
They gnashed their teeth and cried and groaned:
"This is the whiskey seller's home."

4. I traveled on, got there at last;
I thought I'd take one social glass.
I poured it out and stirred it well;
And then I thought of the drunkard's hell.

5. I dashed it out and left the place;
And bowed my knees in redeeming grace;
Five sober years have passed away
Since first I bowed my knees to pray.

6. So I went home to change my life
And to see my long neglected wife;
I found her kneeling by the bed,
Because our infant babe was dead.

7. I told her not to cry or weep
Because our babe was just asleep;
Its happy soul had fled away
To live with Christ through endless days.

8. I took her by her pale white hands;
She was so weak she could not stand;
I set her down and prayed a prayer
That God would only bless us there.

9. They took me through a temperance band;
They led me by a social hand;
The very moment faith regained,
Ten thousand joys around me sprang.

10. And now I'm living a sober life;
I have a good home and a loving wife;
I pray the legislature band
To make a law throughout the land.

11. And stop all whiskey seller's scum
From the mountain to the coast,
That all the drunkard's cries may flee
And leave the land eternally.

23. THE DRUNKARD'S LONE CHILD
"Bessie".
Obtained from Mrs. William Franklin, Crossnore, Avery County, North Carolina, July, 1930, who learned it from her brother, Edmund Malone Johnson. See Spaeth, Weep Some More, My Lady, p. 191. Note the one-time popularity of the "drunkard songs" in community singing in "Some Songs of Long Ago" by Pauline Grahame, The Palimpsest, p. 95, Vol. X, No. 3, March, 1929, published by The State Historical Society, Iowa
City, Iowa.

1. Out in the gloomy night sadly I roam.
I've no mother, no friends, and no home.
Nobody cares for me; nobody would cry,
Even if poor little Bessie should die.

Bare foot and tired I have wandered all day,
Asking for work, but I am too small they say.
On the damp ground I must now lay my head.
Father a drunkard and mother is dead -

CHORUS: Mother, oh, why did you leave me alone
With no one to love me, no friends, and no home?
Dark is the night and the storm rages wild;
God pity Bessie, the drunkard's lone child.

2. We were so happy till father drank rum;
Then all our sorrow and trouble begun;
Mother grew paler and wept every day;
Bobbie and I were too hungry to pray;

Slowly they faded till one summer night
Found their sweet faces all silent and white
And with big tears slowly I said:
"Father a drunkard and mother is dead."
Chorus:

3. Oh, if some temperance man only could find
Poor wretched father and speak very kind;
If they could stop him from drinking,
Only then I would feel very happy again.

Is it too late? Men temperance, please try,
For little Bessie will soon starve and die.
All day long I've been calling for bread -
Father a drunkard and mother is dead.
Chorus:

24. JOHN ATKINS
(Poor drunkards, poor drunkards, take warning by me)
Obtained from Mrs. William Franklin, Crossnore, Avery County, North Carolina, July, 1930. This is another song to drunkards to "take warning". "John Atkins",
however, appears to be a song about some local character who must die for slaying his "dear Companion".

1. Poor drunkards, poor drunkards, take warning by me;
The fruits of transgression behold now I see;
My soul is tormented; my body confined;
My friends and dear children left weeping behind.

2. The whole life of sorrow, behold now I see;
Therefore let poor drunkards take warning by me.
Remember John Atkins, his death and reform,
Lest justice overtakes us and sorrow comes on.


3. Much intoxication, my ruin has been,
For my dear companion I've barbarously slain;
In yonders cold grave yard her body doth lie,
While I am confined and must shortly die.

25. TOM DOOLEY
A. Obtained from Mrs. William Franklin, Crossnore, Avery County, North Carolina, July, 1930, who learned it from her brother, Edmund Malone Johnson. Another song, based on a real tragedy in North Carolina, in which the young man sings that he was warned, "That drinking and the women Would be my ruin at last."
See F. C. Brown, Ballad-Literature in North Carolina, p. ii.

1. Oh, bow your head, Tom Dooley;
Oh, bow your head and cry,
You have killed poor Laury Foster
And you know you're bound to die.

2. You have killed poor Laury Foster;
You know you have done wrong;
You have killed poor Laury Foster,
Your true love in your arms.

3. I take my banjo this evening;
I pick it on my knee;
This time tomorrow evening
It will be of no use to me.

4. This day and one more;
Oh, where do you reckon I be?
This day and one more,
And I'll be in eternity.

5. I had my trial at Wilkesboro;
Oh, what do you reckon they done?
They bound me over to Statesville
And there where I'll be hung.

6. The limb being oak
And the rope being strong -
Oh, bow your head, Tom Dooley,
For you know you are bound to hang.

7. O pappy, O pappy,
What shall I do?
I have lost all my money,
And killed poor Laury too.

8. O mammy, O mammy,
Oh, don't you weep, nor cry;
I have killed poor Laury Foster
And you know I am bound to die.

9. Oh, what my mammy told me
Is about to come to pass -
That drinking and the women
Would be my ruin at last.

B. Tom Dooley
Obtained from Mr. C. L. Franklin, the son of Mrs. William Franklin. The four stanzas recalled by Mr. Franklin vary very slightly from stanzas I, 5, 7, and 9 of A, but 7 is put before 9 in B, becoming there 3 and 4 respectively.

1. Bow your head, Tom Dooley,
Oh, bow your head and cry,
You killed poor Laura Foster
And you know you're bound to die.

2. They had my trial at Wilkesboro
And what do you reckon they done?
They bound me over to Statesville
And that's where I'll be hung.

3. Mama, oh, dear mama,
Your words have come to pass:
Drinking and the women
Would be my ruin at last.

4. Oh, papa, dear papa,
Oh, what can I do ?
I've lost all my money
And killed poor Laura too.


26. FRANCES SILVERS.
Obtained from Miss Ronie Johnson, Crossnore, Avery County, North Carolina, July, 1929. Here is another song about a North Carolina murder which is said to have occurred at Spruce Pine in 1908. It appears to be in the process of becoming "folk". Local tradition has it that Mrs. Silvers composed the song. She is reported as having lived in Morganton. The song might be compared with R. W. Gordon's "jailhouse songs" of the more hardened criminal. See New York Times Magazine, June 19, 1927, p. 15.

Mr. Phillips Barry after seeing the song sent the following comment in a letter of Nov. 14, 1931: "There has never been a time when gallows confessions did not have a strange fascination for the folk. I suspect the authoress was of rather low mentality, but had a good memory and made free use of reminiscences of songs she knew. The first line is from a song still sung in Vermont, said to have been written by a British soldier who
was fatally wounded in one of the battles of the Revolution. I have a copy of it in an American broadside of about 1800. The stanza runs:

It was on a dark and dismal day
When we set sail for America;
The drums did beat and trumpets sound
As unto Boston we were bound.* 

Suggested by lines of Dr. Isaac Watts's hymn:


"My thoughts on awful subjects roll;
Damnation and the dead."  (Note by Mr. Phillips Barry.)

The following note of inquiry made through the kindly interest of Prof. Guy B. Johnson, the answer and comment are worth while printing:



Here is this much. It's too bad he didn't go into a little detail. However, it's at least an "authoritative" note.
Sincerely, Guy B. Johnson, June 12.

1. This dreadful, dark and dismal day
Has swept my glories all away.
My sun goes down, my days are past
And I shall leave this world at last.

2. Lord, what will soon become of me?
I am condemned, you all now see.
To heaven or hell my soul must fly,
All in a moment when I die.

3. Judge Daniel has my sentence passed.
These prison walls I leave at last.
Nothing to cheer my drooping head
Until I'm numbered with the dead.

4. But, oh! the dreadful Judge I fear!
Shall I that awful sentence hear ?
"Depart ye cursed down to hell
And forever there to dwell."

5. I know that frightful ghost I'll see
Gnawing this bone in misery,
And then and there attended be,
For murder in the first degree.

6. There shall I meet that mournful face
Whose blood I spilled upon this place:
With blooming eyes to me he'll say,
"Why did you take my life away?"

7. His feeble hands fell gently down;
His chattering tongue soon lost its sound;
To see his soul and body part -
It strikes with terror to my heart.

8. I took his blooming days away;
Left him no time to God to pray,
And if his sins fell on his head,
Must I not bear them in his stead?

9. The jealous thought that first gave strife
To make me take my husband's life;
For days and months I spent my time
Thinking how to commit the crime.

10. And on a dark and dreadful night
I put his body out of sight.
With flames, I tried him to consume,
But time would not admit to do.

11. You all see me and on me gaze;
Be careful how you spend your days;
And never commit an awful crime,
But try to serve your God in time.

12. My mind's on solemn subjects roll.'
My little child, God bless its soul!
All you that are of Adams' race,
Let not my faults this child disgrace.

13. Farewell, good people, you all now see,
What my bad conduct has brought on me.
To die of shame and in disgrace
Before the world of human race.

14. Awful, indeed, to think of death
In perfect health to lose my breath.
Farewell, my friends, I bid adieu;
Vengeance on me must now pursue.

15. Great God! How shall I be forgiven?
No fit for earth - unfit for heaven!
But little time to pray to God,
For now I'll try that awful road.

The above occurred about 1908. It is a true story. Mrs. Silvers lived at Morganton. The murder occurred near Spruce Pine, N. C. Mrs. Silvers composed the above while in prison and sang it just before she was hanged at Morganton, N. C. (Comments by Miss Ronie Johnson).

27. ORPHAN GIRL
A. "Orphan Girl" Obtained from Mrs. William Franklin, Crossnore, Avery County, North Carolina, July 17, 1930. See Sandburg, p. 319; Bradley Kincaid, Favorite Old Time Songs and Mountain Ballads, p. 27; Shearin and Combs, p. 32; Cox, No. 153; Perrow, Journal, XXVIII, 170.

1. "No home, no home," said a little girl
At the door of a prince's hall
As she trembling sat on the marble steps
And leaned on the polished wall.

2. Her clothes were thin and her feet were bare
And the snow had covered her head.
"Oh, give me a home," she feebly cried,
"A home, and a piece of bread.

3. "My father, alas! I never knew,"
And the tears did fall so bright;
"My mother sleeps in a new made grave;
'Tis an orphan that begs tonight."

4. The night was dark and the snow still fell
And the rich man closed his door
And his proud lips curled as he scornfully said,
"No home, no bread for the poor."

5. While a rich man slept on his velvet bed
And dreamed of his riches and gold;
While an orphan lay on a bed of snow
And mourned, "So cold! so cold!"

6. Another hour and the mid-night storm
Rolled on like a funeral,
While the earth seemed wrapt in a winding sheet,
And the drops of snow still fell.

7. The morning dawn - and the little girl
Still lay at the rich man's door;
But her soul had fled to a home above
Where there's room and bread for the poor.

B. "Orphan Girl"
Obtained from Mrs. C. L. Franklin, Crossnore, Avery County, North Carolina, February, 1930. This version is identical with the version on p. 27 of Bradley Kincaid's Favorite Old Time Songs and Mountain Ballads and also with Sandburg's version B, p. 319.

C. "Orphan Girl"
Obtained from Mrs. Helen Tufts Bailie, 22 De Wolfe Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts, who had it from John Oliver, Cade's Cove, Blount County, Tennessee, April 10, 1931. Mr. Oliver writes that he had it from Mrs. M. J. Lawson-Lequire of Cade's Cove, the daughter of Daniel Brownlow Lawson, "a great-uncle of mine" and "a great singer like all the Lawsons. "He one time owned half the Cove and was justice of the peace thirty years."

1. "No home, no home," cried a little girl
At the door of a princely hall
While she trimbling stood on the marble step
And leaned on the polished wall.

2. Her clothes were thin and her feet were bare
And the snow had covered her head.
"Oh! give me a home," she feebly said -
"A home and a piece of bread.

3. "My father, alas! I never knew" -
And the tears began to rise so bright;
"My mother sleeps in a new made grave;
It's an orphan that begs tonight."

4. Another hour and the snow still fell
And the rich man closed his door
And his proud lips curled as he scornfully said:
"No home, no bread for the poor."

5. "I must freeze," she said as she sank on the steps
And strove to cover her feet
With her tattered clothes all covered with snow -
Yes, covered with snow and sleet.

6. Another hour and the midnight storm
Rolled on like a funerell
The earth seemed wrapped in a winding sheet
And the drapes of snow still fell.

7. The rich man slept on his velvet bed
And dreamed of his silver and gold
While the orphant lies on her bed of snow
And murmurs "so cold, so cold."

8. The morning dawned and the little girl
Still lay at the rich man's door,
But her soul had fled to that home above
Where there's room and bread for the poor.

This Song Ballad wrote by D. B. Lawson, for M. J. Lawson, Aug. 15th, 1880. Daniel Brownlow Lawson was the father of Martha J. Lawson (Lequire) and Leannah Lawson (Spangler), and a great-uncle of John W. Oliver. - John Oliver's Note.

28. ORPHAN'S SONG
Obtained from Mrs. William Franklin, Crossore, Avery County, North Carolina, July, 1930. Cf. Shearin and Combs, p. 32 ("I Have No Mother Now"). Irving Brown in Deep Song, New York, 1929, p. 103, gives the following "lament of a dying Gypsy, who leaves his one motherless child alone in the world:

'You've no father, you've no mother,
You've no sister, you've no brother,
You have no one of your own.
I must leave you all alone."

1. Oh, have you heard the mournful story?
All my friends are dead and gone;
I've no father, nor no mother -
A poor orphan left alone.

2. Mother said to me when dying -
And her breath was almost gone:
"I've no brother, nor no sister, -
A poor orphan left alone.

3. "Take your Bible to your closet;
Read and pray both night and day;
Seek protection in the Lord,
And never more be kept alone."

4. I often think of my condition
And the world so dark and dreary;
My poor heart is almost broken -
A poor orphan left alone.

5. I often walk the lonesome graveyard
Praying for the time to come
By my mother I'll be burried
And no more be left alone.

29. THE BLIND CHILD'S PRAYER
Obtained from Mrs. C. L. Franklin, Crossnore, Avery County, North Carolina, 1930. See Perrow, Journal, XXVIII, 170; Shearin and Combs, p. 32. This song is identical with the one printed in Bradley Kincaid's Favorite Old-Time Songs and Mountain Ballads, p. 32. Cf. also Henry, Journal, XLIV (January-March, 1931).

30. MARY OF THE WILD MOOR
No local title. Obtained from Mrs. Ewart Wilson, Pensacola, North Carolina, August, 1930. See Mackenzie, Ballads and Sea Songs from Nova Scotia, No. 61; Cox, No. 148; Pound, No. 35; Shoemaker, p. Ino (second edition); Journal, XXIX, 185; XXXV, 389; Sturgis and Hughes, Songs from the Hills of Vermont, p. 36.

1. One night when the wind it blew cold -
Blew so bitter across the wild moor -
Young Mary, she came with her child,
Wandering home to her own father's door.

2.
Crying, "Father, oh, pray let me in;
Oh, take pity on me, I implore,
For the child at my bosom will die
From the wind that blows o'er the wild moor."

3. But her father was deaf to her cries;
Not a word or a sound reached the door.
But the watch dog did howl and the wind blew
So bitter across the wild moor.

4. Oh, how must her father have felt,
When he came to the door in the morn!
There he found Mary dead and the child.
Fondly clasped in its dead mother's arms.

31. FRAGMENT
Obtained from Mr. Harold Greene, 1519 Thirty-first Street, N. E., Washington,